Fact: Morticia Addams Makes Strange Look Glamorous

The Addams’ Family’s Morticia Addams is famously strange.

She’s a descendant of the Salem witches, she wears all black and she cuts rose blossoms to keep the stems for her stem bouquet. Her name alone is eerily similar to the word ‘mortician,’ aka the person who deals with deceased bodies. Plus, she’s the mother who names her kids Wednesday Addams and Pugsley Addams.

Sure, Morticia Addams is strange — but that’s what makes her so iconic.

She’s creepy and she’s spooky but she’s also a goddess. (Photo from NewNowNext)

Morticia is unlike any of the female cartoon protagonists we watched during our childhood days. The matriarch of the spookiest family on TV isn’t one for butterflies and all things pink. Nope; she’s all about the kooky and mysterious, the seduction and transparency. We may have not noticed it when we were children, but Morticia Addams is an icon in terms of fashion, parenting and becoming a woman, in general.

Confident in Her Pale, Pale Skin

To a normal pair of eyes, Morticia is incredibly weird but she doesn’t care. She marches to the beat of her drum. If she wants to live in a haunted mansion with a severed hand, a Frankenstein-like butler and a grave for a backyard, she will.

In fact, Morticia thinks it’s odd that the rest of the world abides by societal rules. She lives life the way she wants to.

Morticia is also confident in her skin. She may be pasty white, but she’s gorgeous. If you think she’s the vampire queen, she doesn’t care. She forces others to accept her norm or not at all.  She wears that long black dress like a queen. It’s no wonder there’s no shortage of people wearing a Morticia Addams costume during Halloween.

The Horror Queen of Body Positivity

In line with her confidence, can we talk about Morticia’s body positivity? There’s a reason Gomez calls her cara mia with such fondness.

Intensely passionate, sexually liberated and very hot, Morticia reminds everyone that women have needs and desires. She always tells Gomez what she wants and she’s never afraid to ask for it. For example, she asks Gomez to stay unhinged and be like a “desperate, howling demon” that frightened her. The best part about it is that Morticia Addams demands what she wants sans the hyper-sexualized trope Jessica Rabbit is infamous for.

Her Timeless Vampire Queen Fashion

Of course, no Morticia Addams conversation is complete without her dress and makeup. Easily, she’s the most glamorous member of the Addams Family, with her waist-length jet-black raven hair and a slim body wrapped around by a skintight black gown. It’s the trademark Morticia Addams costume.

Here’s a pro-tip: if you want to dress like Morticia Addams, you can’t go wrong with going all black. Start with your hair. Morticia is famous for her long black locks so if you have dark hair already, good for you. If now, black hair dye or a black Morticia Wig will suffice.

As for the trademark Morticia Addams dress, a tight and long black dress is a must-have. Plus points if you can squeeze yourself in a corset since she’s known for her tiny waist.

For the iconic Morticia Addams makeup, her pale foundation is the best place to start. Blend your palest liquid foundation as if your life depends on it before patting it down with light powder. For your eyebrows, use your darkest eyebrow pencil to fill in your brows. Exaggerate your brow shape both out and up. It’s OK if your eyebrows look drawn on; this is the Morticia Addams aesthetic. Give your Morticia look an edgy touch with eyebrow slits.

Don’t forget to coat your lids with fancy frosted eye shadow and apply mascara to both your top and bottom lashes.

Cap off your Morticia Addams look with a deep red lipstick and long, sharp, red nails.

Nothing Beats Addams Family Values

Morticia Addams is the mom figure who lets you set the neighbors’ home on fire so you’ll learn good manners. (Photo from Film and Furniture)

As a parent, Morticia practices a refreshing style: loving yet direct, engaged yet hands-off. The Addams family matriarch doesn’t sugarcoat around her kids. Wednesday and Pugsley know that children aren’t gifts from storks; they know that babies are products of parents having sex.

In terms of parenting her daughter Wednesday, Morticia is all about empowerment. For instance, when she was talking about their great-aunt Calpurnia, she says that she was burned in 1706. Before her death, she enslaved a minister and danced naked in the town square. She surprises the people she’s talking to by telling them she’s told Wednesday to finish college first before she could do the same thing if she wants to.

Morticia is also very upfront with the needs of her children. In an era where most cartoon moms are stay-at-home or working, Morticia sets herself apart by being in the middle. In “Addams Family Values,” the family welcomes a third child named Pubert. Realizing that she needs help, she hires a nanny (a secretly murderous one, that is). To give herself some “Me Time,” Morticia sought the help of a nanny, emphasizing the importance of moms taking care themselves when needed.

The Queen of Quotes

When it comes to making a statement, Morticia Addams is your queen. Her quotes are worth the Instagram, Facebook or Twitter caption.

Here are some of Morticia’s best quotes:

  • “Darling, I always wear black.”
  • “Life’s not all lovely thorns and singing vultures, you know.”
  • “This morning when I woke up and the sky was all dark and cloudy, I knew right then and there that this was going to be a lovely day.”
  • “Oh Gomez, it’s dark it’s depressing, it’s desolate. It’s a dream.”
  • “Hearts are wild creatures. That’s why our ribs are cages.”
  • “Scream if you need anything.”
  • “Normal is an illusion. What is normal for the spider is chaos for the fly.”
  • “That moment when you witness karma in its full glorious splendor.”

The bottom line is: Morticia Addams is the multi-faceted queen everyone should aspire to be. She’s independent, she’s hot, she’s a good mother and she’s strange. She’s the feminist mother we never knew we needed.

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